Events, Food History

Goodwood Revival 2015 – A Retro Gastronomist’s Delight!

  • My e-photo album of Goodwood Revival 2015, a world-class nostalgia event. Uploaded to You Tube 23.9.15.
Me in the Press Centre at Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange
Filing copy in the Press Centre at Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange
Me reporting on The Battle of Britain anniversary at Goodwood Revival for Solent TV. ©Viva Blancmange
Reporting on The Battle of Britain anniversary at Goodwood Revival for Solent TV. ©Viva Blancmange

Exciting news, tickets for Goodwood Revival 2016 are now on sale! Keep an eye on Twitter (@goodwoodrevival) for further announcements. Tickets sell-out VERY quickly, so get in early to avoid disappointment. Check-out my history blog, Come Step Back In Time, for an in-depth article on Goodwood Revival 2015. CLICK HERE.

If you have never been to or heard of Goodwood Revival, let me explain. It is a retro-themed, annual event, which takes place at the Goodwood Estate, Chichester, West Sussex, over three days (Friday to Sunday), during mid-September. In 2016, Goodwood Revival will be Friday 9th to Sunday 11th September, inclusive (these dates to be confirmed by 31st December, 2015).

The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre at Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange
The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre at Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange

This year’s Goodwood Revival had a strong emphasis on retro food (as you can imagine, this pleased me no end!). The 60th anniversary of the fish finger was marked with an authentic trawler situated near to the main entrance.

©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

In actual fact the very first reference to a ‘fish finger’ appeared in a British magazine in 1900. American scientist, Clarence Birdseye (1886-1956), who began his career as a taxidermist, is credited with bringing the humble fish finger to the British tea-table in 1955.

©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

Birdseye began his journey to becoming the founder of the modern freezer industry whilst on a fishing trip to Newfoundland between 1912 and 1915. He noticed the Inuits left their freshly caught fish and caribou meat out in the open air, where the intense cold froze it solid, very quickly. He spent several years experimenting with the freezing process and in 1925, produced his first commercially frozen food. In 1930, his first distribution centre opened at Springfield, Massachusetts.

After World War Two, Britain had an abundance of herrings. Birdseye recognised the potential of this fish surplus in terms of food retail and decided to push forward with his idea for frozen fish fingers. Conducting market research in Southampton and South Wales, Birdseye gave the public a chance to try either ‘Herring Savouries’ or ‘Cod Sticks’. Much to Birdseye’s surprise, the public preferred Cod Sticks. In Britain, 1955, his company Birds Eye, finally launched their famous fish finger at a price of 1 shilling 8d. The fish finger was developed in the company’s old factory in Great Yarmouth by Mr H. A. J. Scott.

©Viva Blancmange
Bendicks on The Revival High Street. ©Viva Blancmange

Another heritage brand represented on The Revival High Street at Goodwood this year was Bendicks. Bendicks have been manufacturing after dinner mints since 1931, their shop at the Revival was based upon the firm’s original 1930s Mayfair shop. Founders of Bendicks, Mr Oscar Benson and Colonel ‘Bertie’ Dickson, produced their first ever chocolate mint in 1930. Benson and Dickson acquired a small confectionery business at the unassuming address of 184 Church Street, in Kensington, London.

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This year’s Revival took place 2 days after the anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II (1926- ) becoming the longest-serving monarch, having reigned longer than her great-great Grandmother Queen Victoria (1819-1901) who reigned for 23,226 days. In recognition of this extraordinary milestone, Bendicks launched a limited edition box of Elizabethan Dark Chocolate Mints in celebration of HM Queen Elizabeth II. Bendicks were awarded a Royal Warrant by Her Majesty The Queen in 1962.

Tesco supermarket fitted-out as it would have been in the mid 1960s situated on The Revival Street. ©Viva Blancmange
Tesco supermarket fitted-out as it would have been in the mid 1960s situated on The Revival Street. ©Viva Blancmange

Tesco, one of the major sponsors of Goodwood Revival, recreated a mid 1960’s store stocked with authentic products on The Revival High Street. This is one of the event’s most popular exhibits, the interior of the supermarket is truly spectacular to behold. Shelves stacked high with period accurate products, packaging had been recreated with painstaking attention to detail. If Tesco return to Goodwood Revival in 2016, I urge you to visit this exhibit.

©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

Tesco has been a retail icon on the British high street since 1919, when Jack Cohen (1898-1979) started selling surplus groceries from a stall in the East End of London. The Tesco brand first appeared 5 years later in 1924 when he bought a ship of tea from a Mr T.E. Stockwell. The initials and letters were combined to form Tes-co and in 1929 Mr Cohen opened the flagship Tesco store in Burnt Oak, North London.

©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

In the 1960s, self-service supermarkets gradually became a common sight on many high streets in Britain. This new style of supermarket allowed the customer to push a trolley or carry a wire basket around an open-plan food emporium and choose products for themselves. The latter task having previously been carried-out by a shop assistant who would fulfil your order, collate and package up the items for you.

©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

Supermarkets carried a much wider range of stock than the humble village store and shoppers now enjoyed a more emancipated shopping experience. In 1968, Tesco opened its first ‘superstore’ in Crawley, West Sussex. If the Tesco exhibit returns to Goodwood Revival in 2016, do take the time to visit, it won’t disappoint. It is great fun identifying products that we still have on our supermarket shelves in 2015!

Inside The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
Inside The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange

The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre at Goodwood Revival was another personal favourite and a must-see for fans of retro food and historic kitchenalia. My short film, at the start of this article, contains many images of this exhibit including action shots of well-known cookery demonstrators, Brendan Lynch, Miranda Gore-Browne and burlesque baker, Charlotte White.

Burlesque baker Charlotte White in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
Burlesque baker Charlotte White in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange

Kenneth Maynard Wood (1916-1997) first became interested in food mixers after World War Two when he brought a Sunbeam mixer, stripped it down and redesigned it. The first kitchen product Ken Wood retailed on the British market was actually the ‘Turn Over Toaster’ (model A100), manufactured in 1947 from his company based in Woking. This style of toaster had been popular since the 1920s.

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Kenwood food mixers have been kitchen icons since 1950 when the company launched iconic model A700, Kenwood Chef, at the Ideal Home Exhibition with the promise that it was ‘The world’s most versatile kitchen machine!’. The A700 was so popular that when Harrods stocked it, the mixer sold-out within a week and shot straight to the top of every bride’s wedding list. By 1956, Kenwood’s turnover reached £1.5 million and the company employed 400 staff.

A700 Kenwood Chef (1950-1957) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Come Step Back In Time
A700 Kenwood Chef (1950-1957) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange

In 1962, Kenwood moved its manufactory to Havant, Hampshire (and is still there today). In the 1960s, Kenwood ran into difficulties, in part due to a manufacturing problem with one of its refrigeration products. There followed a hostile takeover by Thorn Electrical Group in 1968 which resulted in Ken Wood being ousted out of his own company.

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A305 Kenwood Minor Hand Mixer (1960s) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
A305 Kenwood Minor Hand Mixer (1960s) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange

Ken Wood then became Managing Director of Dawson-Keith Holdings where he remained until 1981. Following the Thorn takeover, Ken Wood continued to live near Havant and created a golf course there, he also founded the Forest Mere Health Farm, Liphook, Hampshire.

A901 Kenwood Chef (1980s) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange
A901 Kenwood Chef (1980s) on display in The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre. ©Viva Blancmange

  • TV documentary from 1981 on the history of Kenwood Food Mixers. Includes interviews with the founder Kenneth Wood and the industrial designer Kenneth Grange. Uploaded to John Wood’s You Tube Channel 23.10.2015. (John is Ken Wood’s step son. You can follow John on Twitter @uptone – he often posts Kenwood related Tweets including images and archive footage of his late step father. John also blogs at http://uptone.blogspot.co.uk/ ).
In The Kenwood Kitchen Theatre, audience members were given some fantastic booklets featuring iconic Kenwood recipes from the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Below are a selection of recipes from these gorgeous retro cuisine freebies, I just had to share them with you!
 ©Viva Blancmange.
©Viva Blancmange.

From the 1940s booklet:

Kenwood Health & Beauty Cocktail

1 carrot, sprig of parsley, 1 apple (small cooking), few grapes. Using the Juice Separator (Centrifugal Juicer). Method: Prepare carrot and cut-up apple. Separate at Speed 4-6, placing the parsley between the pieces of apple. Serve at once. We also recommend either by themselves or mixed as desired, the juices of grapes, apples, tomatoes, black and red-currants, carrot, beetroot, cabbage. (The Kenwood Recipe Book)

Lemon Meringue Pie

4 oz sugar, 2 oz plain flour, pinch of salt, 2 eggs, 1/2 oz butter, 1/2 pint of boiling water, juice and grated rind of 1 large lemon. Method: Line a shallow dish with short pastry, prick well and back in a hot oven for 10-15 minutes at 425F. Place into a saucepan (or double boiler) the sugar, flour and salt. Gradually add the water, stirring all the time. Simmer gently for 10-15 minutes to ensure thorough cooking of the flour. Add the butter and using the Minor de Luxe, beat the yolks, lemon juice and rind together and gradually stir the flour sauce into them, a little at a time, so as not to cook the eggs too quickly. Fill the pie case with this mixture. (The Kenwood Minor Deluxe Food Mixer Instruction Book Including Tested Recipes).

From the 1950s booklet:

Bourbon Biscuits

3 oz plain flour, 2  1/2 oz butter or margarine, 1 oz sugar, 1 dsp custard powder, 1 dsp cocoa or chocolate powder, 1 small egg yolk, a few drops of vanilla essence. Method: Use the ‘K’ beater. Sieve flour, custard powder and cocoa into the bowl, add all the other ingredients and switch to minimum speed. As mixture begins to combine increase to speed 2 and mix to a firm dough. Roll the dough out thinly on a floured board, trimming sides. Prick with a fork, sprinkle with caster sugar and cut into fingers about 1″ by 3″. Bake in a moderate oven 10-15 minutes. When the biscuits are cold, sandwich together with chocolate cream filling. Chocolate Cream Filling: 3 oz icing sugar, 1  1/2 oz butter,  1 dsp chocolate powder, vanilla essence. Method: Place all ingredients in bowl and mix with whisk on speed 4 until creamy. (All about your new Kenwood Chef, p. 74).

Meat Patties

1 lb beef steak or left-over cold meat, 1 rasher of fat bacon, 1 medium sized onion, 1 medium sized potato, 1 medium sized tomato, 1 egg, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper, a few sprigs of parsley, a little flour. Serves 2-3. Uses mincing and ‘K’ beater. Method: Mince meat, bacon, tomato, parsley, onion and potato on speed 4, using fine screen, using mixing bowl to catch minced food. Add egg and seasoning and blend together with ‘K’ beater on speed 2.  Shape into patties and dust lightly with flour. Fry in hot fat, allowing about 10 minutes each side. (All about your new Kenwood Chef, p.47).

From the 1960s booklet:

Party Titbits

2 cups ‘Shreddies’, 1 cup puffed wheat, 1 cup ‘Cheerios’, 1 packet small pretzels, 1lb mixed whole nuts, 4 oz butter, 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce, 1/2 tsp celery salt, 1/2 tsp onion salt. Method: Using the liquidiser. combine the cereals, pretzels and nuts in a large ovenproof dish. Melt the butter and pour into liquidiser with other ingredients. Blend on maximum speed for 30 seconds. Pour over the mixture in the dish and stir to coat the cereal. Bake in a moderate oven (350F) for about 1 hour, stirring the mixture every 15 minutes. Spread out on absorbent paper until cold and if not required immediately, store in an airtight tin. (Kenwood Recipe Book, 1967).

Cheese Rods

1lb peeled potatoes, 1 oz butter, 3 oz cheese, 2 oz dried breadcrumbs, pinch cayenne pepper, 1/2 tsp salt and pepper, 1/2 tsp paprika, far for frying. Method: Using colander and sieve, ‘K’ beater and shredder. Cook the potatoes in salted boiling water until soft. Meanwhile, grate the cheese into the bowl using no. 1 drum on the shredder. Drain the potatoes and using coarse screen, pass them through the colander and sieve into the bowl. Add 1 oz of the breadcrumbs, salt, pepper and cayenne. Mix with the ‘K’ beater on low speed until well combined. Mix the paprika with remaining breadcrumbs and spread on a pastry board. Roll the potato mixture in the crumbs, a portion at a time, to form cylinders about 3/4″ thick. Cut into 3″ lengths and fry in deep fat until brown. Drain well on crumpled paper and serve warm with salads or lunch and supper dishes.

From the 1970s booklet:

Cheese and Celery Pie (“For picnics or parties – this savoury pie is delicious hot or cold”)

8 oz flour, 2 oz butter, 2 oz lard, salt, water to mix. Filling: 4 oz cheese, 2 sticks of celery, 1/2 onion, 2 tbsp. green pepper cut into thin strips, 1 egg, 1/4 pt milk, 1/2 tsp salt, good pinch celery salt, good pinch garlic salt, good pinch pepper. Method: Using ‘K’ beater, liquidiser, slicer and shredder. Prepare shortcrust pastry pie case reserving half the dough for top of pie. Prepare cheese, celery, onion with coarse shredder and add sliced pepper. Blend egg, milk and seasoning in liquidiser at maximum speed for 10 seconds. Pour over other ingredients and stir to combine. Place mixture into pie case, cover with remaining piece of pastry, sealing the edges well and making two or three slits to allow steam to escape. Bake in a hot oven 15 minutes or until top is nicely brown, then reduce heat and cook for a further 15-20 minutes.  (All about your new Kenwood Chef, p.73)

 ©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
There is something for everyone at Goodwood Revival, young and old. Whether you are a vintage lifestyle enthusiast, petrolhead, living history or aviation fanatic you will not fail to enjoy your day-out (or weekend) at Goodwood. But do hurry, tickets sell-out incredibly quickly. You cannot purchase tickets on the gate, all tickets must be brought in advance.
  • To book tickets for Goodwood Revival 2016, CLICK HERE.
  • Keep an eye on Twitter (@goodwoodrevival) for all the latest event news.
  • Check-out my Pinterest board of Goodwood Revival 2015, showcasing some of my favourite photographs taken during the weekend. You may find inspiration on there for creating your 2016 Revival outfit. CLICK HERE.
Me taking a quick, 1960s style, selfie. Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange
Taking a quick, 1960s style, selfie. Goodwood Revival 2015. ©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange
©Viva Blancmange

2 thoughts on “Goodwood Revival 2015 – A Retro Gastronomist’s Delight!”

    1. Oh thank-you so much:) I have so many spare photos of Kenwood and Tesco store. Hard to choose which ones to include in the final articles. Do go, it is incredible. There were lots of other heritage food brands there too. I just picked my favourites to showcase here. When they say ‘immersive’ they really mean it. A lovely atmosphere, safe, fun and packed full of nostalgia. Emx

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